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After a long winter cooped up indoors, it’s finally spring. Translation: time to break out of your hibernation station and get some fresh air. Something about spring—warmer weather, more time outside, maybe some new opportunities—makes everything seem more exciting. The season is so fresh and new that even spring cleaning can feel good (seriously).

“Spring cleaning is a refreshing feeling. It’s almost like a reset button and can help you create a peaceful, clutter-free work or living environment,” says Shelby C., a third-year undergraduate at Northern Illinois University.

When we talked to students, it turns out there’s a lot to be excited about in spring (beyond cleaning, we promise) and a lot of ways to enjoy the season. Check out our favorites below.

1. Get outdoors

Hiking, biking, running, swimming—you name it, it’s all back on your list of weekend activities come spring. Aside from being fun, getting outside has some added benefits. And those benefits go way beyond helping you learn. Getting out into some green space, whether that’s a hiking trail or city park, can help reduce your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stress, and high blood pressure, according to a 2018 report by researchers in the UK. “I always feel really good after having spent the day outdoors and being physically active. Especially if it means I got to do it with my loved ones,” says Charlotte V., a third-year undergraduate at the University of New Brunswick in Canada.

And those benefits go way beyond helping you learn. Getting out into some green space, whether that’s a hiking trail or city park, can help reduce your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stress, and high blood pressure, according to a 2018 report by researchers in the UK. “I always feel really good after having spent the day outdoors and being physically active. Especially if it means I got to do it with my loved ones,” says Charlotte V., a third-year undergraduate at the University of New Brunswick in Canada.

2. Volunteer

Many of you reported spring is the season for giving your time to others—nearly a third of the students we surveyed said volunteering was one of their top three spring activities.

If you haven’t tried it yet, volunteer for a cause you believe in. It might help you connect with people who share your energy and values—and it can help you network for future career opportunities. Check out your options at DoSomething.org.

3. Unplug

Despite all the intense headlines, social media isn’t all bad—as a 2017 review of studies confirmed, social media is often a powerful (positive) way to connect and build relationships. But too much screen time can lead to lack of sleep and increased risk of depression, the same study found.

Use the longer, warmer days as an excuse to enjoy some screen-free downtime. “Spending time outdoors doing something physical like hiking is a great way to be away from your phone, computer, and TV,” says Erin J., a fifth-year student at Clemson University in South Carolina.

4. Spring clean

OK, maybe it’s not the best thing about spring (though 12 percent of the students we surveyed thought it was), but spring cleaning can be a great way to set yourself up to finish the year strong.

Organizing our closets and bedrooms can help us create an environment more conducive to relaxation and productivity. Really—a 2011 study published in the Journal of Neuroscience found that looking at clutter can create chaos in your brain. In other words, if your living spaces are a mess, it can hamper your ability to study. Spring cleaning also has an added bonus: Having a de-cluttered home will save time in the mornings (maybe even earning you an extra five minutes of sleep).

“Visible mess helps distract us from the true source of the disorder,” says Marie Kondo, author of The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and unofficial spokesperson of spring cleaning.

Per Kondo’s advice, ask yourself the following when cleaning out your closet and dresser:

  • Do I need this? If the answer is a resounding yes, keep it.
  • Does it fit? If not, donate it.
  • Does it have sentimental value? If yes, keep it. But if you haven’t worn it in over a year, consider donating it.
  • When was the last time I wore it? Again, if it’s been more than a year, chances are you won’t wear it again. Donate.

5. Spend time with close friends + family

Whether you’re at an event, hanging out with a few friends, or relaxing one-on-one, research shows that spending time with friends and loved ones makes us happier, healthier, and helps us live longer lives. Friendships are so vital to our well-being, they can actually help ward off serious health issues, including heart disease, high blood pressure, and even cancer, according to the findings of a review of studies published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior in 2010.

“Being around family and friends is great [way] to relieve stress,” says Blake*, a third-year student at the University of Utah.

6. Get active

One of the best things about spring, according to the students we surveyed, is the chance to be more active after a season of hibernating. “I love being physically active because not only does it make me feel physically happy, but it makes a huge, positive impact on my mental health,” says McKenzie T., a third-year student at the University of North Dakota. Whether it’s playing sports or simply moving more, spring is bursting with chances to get back into action.

7. Travel

The number one thing students we surveyed said they looked forward to in the spring? Getting out and traveling.

“I love to go camping or traveling because it help[s] me relax,” says Helen Z., a third-year student at Queen’s University in Canada. “Also, I can put down my phone and actually enjoy nature.”

Other ideas for a fantastic spring

Friends eating street food

Going on photography walks

“You get to spend some time outdoors and see the trees, flowers, and plants reviving.”
—Helena G., fourth-year undergraduate, Clemson University, Georgia 

Gardening

“I enjoy getting a plant in the spring and taking care of it. It is a nice, solitary activity.”
—Mariana C., third-year graduate student, University of Montana Billings 

Hitting up local festivals

“It’s a good time to enjoy a free concert, free games and activities, and, my personal favorite, free food.”
Nic S.*, fourth-year undergraduate, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Taking time to just enjoy the weather

“I love just being outside in the fresh air.”
—Robert H., fifth-year student, Marquette University, Michigan

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Article sources

Kondō, M., & Hirano, C. (2014). The life-changing magic of tidying up: The Japanese art of decluttering and organizing (First American edition.). Berkeley: Ten Speed Press.

Kuo, M., Browning, M., & Penner, M. (2018). Do lessons in nature boost subsequent classroom engagement? Refueling students in flight. Frontiers in Psychology. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02253

McMains, S., & Kastner, S. (2011). Interactions of top-down and bottom-up mechanisms in human visual cortex. Journal of Neuroscience, 31(2), 587–597. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3766-10.2011

Uhls, Y. T., Ellison, N. B., & Subrahmanyam, K. (2017). Benefits and costs of social media in adolescence. Pediatrics, 140(2).

Umberson, D., & Karas Montez, J. (2010). Social relationships and health: A flashpoint for health policy. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 51, S54–66. doi: 10.1177/0022146510383501 

University of East Anglia. (2018, June 7). It’s official—spending time outside is good for you. Retrieved from https://www.uea.ac.uk/about/-/it-s-official-spending-time-outside-is-good-for-you